Mac 610

8433jeff

Capt. Sunshine
Joined
Jul 31, 2013
Messages
10,736
Reaction score
68,532
Location
Southern Minnesota
Ever notice that the only thing wrong with a Mac 610 is that it might be a little heavy? And, Stihl owners who paid two or three times as much money for the same power do nothing but make fun of them.
When they first came out, they were as heavy as a Stihl 031/032, maybe a smidge heavier. The Stihl was an award winning design, and still not an easy saw to work on. But easier than a 610. And not twice the money new.

Poulans at the time were lighter and as fast, I would say faster. A 4000 against a 610 is a mismatch IMO, the yellow and black fellow behind at best, way behind in comfort and weight. Partner, again as fast, again lighter. Homelite, a much more dated design, as fast and lighter. 610's may be lighter than a 261 Olympyk, not by over a pound, and as fast, but not as easy to work on, and the Olympyk frame was the same as a 271/281, which would run circles around and over a 610.

Thing is, those other saws were all replaced once and sometimes twice by the end of the 610's run, which sadly, could be blamed for McCulloch's demise, though I would blame management instead.
 

Modifiedmark

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2013
Messages
1,369
Reaction score
3,685
When did the 60cc 610 come out? I want to say 1978 or so.

For fun I will list the saws in that size range that were available in 1978 that had antivibe.

North American made saws

Homelite 360 57cc
Poulan 3400 56cc or the 4200 69cc
Pioneer P-41, yeah it was 66cc but the 58cc Pioneer P-38 didn't come out for another year or two.

Furrin saws
Echo 602VL 60cc
Dolmar 119 61cc
Husqvarna 61 61cc
Jonsered 66E 61cc
Partner P55 55cc or F65A 65cc
Stihl 041AV 61cc
 

homelitejim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2013
Messages
261
Reaction score
915
What is this hard to work on stuff? I tore this saw down to the case, cleaned it up, rebuilt the carb and oilier, new fuel line, and re assembled in maybe two and a half hours total. I hate that I am defending this saw. It is cold here and the damn thing starts in 4 to 5 pulls. Echoshawn was here to witness it, even hefts dang close to a 272 with the same length bar, all unscientific and precieved weight. I will test actual cutting performance when a appropriate log arrives and I have a camera man.
 

Modifiedmark

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2013
Messages
1,369
Reaction score
3,685
What is this hard to work on stuff? I tore this saw down to the case, cleaned it up, rebuilt the carb and oilier, new fuel line, and re assembled in maybe two and a half hours total. I hate that I am defending this saw. It is cold here and the damn thing starts in 4 to 5 pulls. Echoshawn was here to witness it, even hefts dang close to a 272 with the same length bar, all unscientific and precieved weight. I will test actual cutting performance when a appropriate log arrives and I have a camera man.


A 272 will weigh about 2 lbs less then a 610. You must be one strong dude.

I don't need to see your video, like I said, I have already owned and ran 5 or 6 of them myself.
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2014
Messages
52
Reaction score
49
Heavy is a perceived characteristic. Some of us are wimpier than others. And not all of us are using our saws for 8 hours at time like loggers to notice a pound of weight difference at the end of the day.

Easy to work on is relative. Some of us have more patience than others, and if you know a saw disassembly and reassembly can go twice as quick compared to someone naive with how to work on it. I wouldn't say my McCullough 4610 is hard to work on - I would say it is time consuming since there are a lot of steps to get the carb off or to remove the jug.

Whatever saw you own is a good saw in my book if it runs well and cuts wood.
 

Wood Doctor

New Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
183
Reaction score
160
When did the 60cc 610 come out? I want to say 1978 or so.

For fun I will list the saws in that size range that were available in 1978 that had antivibe.

North American made saws

Homelite 360 57cc
Poulan 3400 56cc or the 4200 69cc
Pioneer P-41, yeah it was 66cc but the 58cc Pioneer P-38 didn't come out for another year or two.

Furrin saws
Echo 602VL 60cc
Dolmar 119 61cc
Husqvarna 61 61cc
Jonsered 66E 61cc
Partner P55 55cc or F65A 65cc
Stihl 041AV 61cc
I believe I bought my Mac 610 in early 1977 for $175 in Connecticut. I think I can dig up the receipt. She still runs. I dropped a huge red oak tree that was killed by gypsy moths and used the wood to heat the whole house the following winter.
 

heimannm

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2014
Messages
1,121
Reaction score
3,483
Location
Dike, Iowa
The 600 Series in all of the different variations (610, 605, 650, 655, Eager Beaver, Timber Bear, Silver Eagle) varied between 3.4 and 3.7 In³ and the perceived power/performance differences were often referenced. I have often heard that the 650 (ones with the yellow metal AF cover) were the peppiest of the group but my own experience is a Timber Bear with new rings outperforms the others we have.

Production in different forms ran from 1978 through 1996, that is an 18 year run.

There were several different 10 Series that were produced concurrently with the 600 Series saws but even the PM700 + PM4300 only ran from 1977 through 1992. The PM800, 805, 850, Super PM850, PM8200, and Double Eagle 80 all came and went but the 600 tarried on.

As with Homelite Jim, I am not defending the 600 Series saws, simply pointing out that they were commercially successful, otherwise McCulloch would not have continued producing them all those years.

Mark
 

Wood Doctor

New Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
183
Reaction score
160
There was also a 5700 series that used the same case and engine size and was produced I believe in the 1990s. They may have been the swan song of the same engine design as the 610. I have one of these and it seems to outperform the 605 and be equal to the 610 in power. The original owner treated it like dirt, unfortunately. I did the best I could to clean it up, but the case bottom and chain brake are somewhat corroded. It still runs well, however, and I have stopped the deterioration.
 

heimannm

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2014
Messages
1,121
Reaction score
3,483
Location
Dike, Iowa
A nice film of oil normally does the trick, add some sawdust if you want to hide the imperfections as well.

Mark
 

Wood Doctor

New Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
183
Reaction score
160
How do you stop the "white death"?
I assume you mean the corrosion? First, store the saw off the ground or concrete, preferably on a shelf. Rub it down with vinegar and a scrub brush. Third, coat the surface with oil, such as diesel fuel, furniture oil, or even cooking oil using a rag to rub it in. Storing it off the ground is the best possible measure to prevent further corrosion.

That's my method. but Mark Heimann has more saws resting in peace than anyone I know, so he might chime in with one of his formulas. Oops, he beat me to the punch.
 

homelitejim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2013
Messages
261
Reaction score
915
http://youtu.be/3uo751_yLzw

I ended up with a 28" mcculloch bar that someone used as a machete. I ground and ground on it till I felt safe enough to run a chain around it for a cut or two. The wood is ponderosa pine and is big enough to burry a 28" bar in granted it is soft wood but it is what we cut and burn around here. I was able to lean on it a few times and it never stalled and the oilier was able to throw oil off the tip of the bar.
 

echoshawn

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2013
Messages
3,705
Reaction score
22,231
Location
Woods of North Idaho
http://youtu.be/3uo751_yLzw

I ended up with a 28" mcculloch bar that someone used as a machete. I ground and ground on it till I felt safe enough to run a chain around it for a cut or two. The wood is ponderosa pine and is big enough to burry a 28" bar in granted it is soft wood but it is what we cut and burn around here. I was able to lean on it a few times and it never stalled and the oilier was able to throw oil off the tip of the bar.

Wait, so that bar was usable? LOL
 

homelitejim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2013
Messages
261
Reaction score
915
I wouldn't want to use it all day for fear of the chain coming off. I had to take that bottom rail down quite a bit.
 

homelitejim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2013
Messages
261
Reaction score
915
Just enough to prove your point.


Sent from right here
The main point proven here is that $5 worth of junk can out perform much more expensive pieces of machinery thanks to the saw geniuses at McCullough USA.
 

homelitejim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2013
Messages
261
Reaction score
915
Skip? Definitely sharp.
Yes skip. Yes sharp. Only 60cc's and a homeowner saw, not some $600-$700 pro saw. Is it a bit heavy? Yes but so is the ms310 and husky 460. For what it is it's not a bad performing saw.
 

Latest posts

Top