Scanners?

Modifiedmark

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I have always been a avid collector of vintage chainsaw manuals, IPL's brochures etc. I am not the only one either and we have all been to the beg for manuals threads looking for info.

That said I have a extensive collection already but since I just came up with that haul of dealers manuals and such last weekend I have decided to think further about how I'm going to convert a lot of this to digital format.

I used to have a Cannon Canoscan flatbed scanner and it worked pretty good. Time consuming but ok. It finally became outdated and they no longer supported drivers for anything after Win 98SE, so it got disposed of. I ended up with a all in one printer on which the scanner on it is a pain in the ass to use. It hinges from the side so half of my pages end up upside down and had to be reorientated before I could save them to PDF. The flatbed scanner cover hinged at the top so I could just slide the pages past and not have any upside down

I want to get a scanner and dedicate it to scanning all these manuals, but not sure what to get.

I see there are hand held scanners but know nothing about them. Are they any good or should I just pickup another flatbed with the hinge on the top?

I'm open for suggestions.
 

mdavlee

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I use the kodak printer and it has worked good even scanning spikes. I don't know how it would do with book stuff though.
 

Philbert

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Thanks for helping to make these documents available!

Nothing works as well as a flat bed scanner for doing a lot of stuff, and a lot of different kinds/sizes of stuff (photos, line drawings, text, etc.).

The auto feed scanners are good for single sheet, uniform size/type, paper. The hand held ones are for quick and dirty scans. I have used my iPhone for scans that have to be readable, but not super accurate.

That said, even manuals will scan easier if you slit/unbind them so that they lay flat. It affects the originals, but makes the copies better.

The quality of the scanning software is also important - ease of use, consistency, editing/adjustments, etc. There is no reason why even the most basic ones should not be very good at this point, but I never cease to be surprised. Some may work better with your computer and OS than others, so check compatibility. Some depends on how fussy you are - if you want to edit out grease stains and handwritten notes, improve contrast, etc.




Philbert
 
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Modifiedmark

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I use the kodak printer and it has worked good even scanning spikes. I don't know how it would do with book stuff though.

Thanks, I think.
We just got an Epson it's done well so far
Ok, but what type is it?

Thanks for helping to make these documents available!

Nothing works as well as a flat bed scanner for doing a lot of stuff, and a lot of different kinds/sizes of stuff (photos, line drawings, text, etc.).

The auto feed scanners are good for single sheet, uniform size/type, paper. The hand held ones are for quick and dirty scans. I have used my iPhone for scans that have to be readable, but not super accurate.

That said, even manuals will scan easier if you slit/unbind them so that they lay flat. It affects the originals, but makes the copies better.

The quality of the scanning software is also important - ease of use, consistency, editing/adjustments, etc. There is no reason why even the most basic ones should not be very good at this point, but I never cease to be surprised. Some may work better with your computer and OS than others, so check compatibility. Some depends on how fussy you are - if you want to edit out grease stains and handwritten notes, improve contrast, etc.




Philbert
Your kinda generalizing I was looking for all those things you mention but a little more detailed.

Some of these I will not be taking apart just to scan and thats why I was wondering if a handheld was worth the powder to blow it up.


I have always used Cannon stuff, most of there software is pretty user friendly and will be keeping that in mind.
 

mdavlee

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Thanks, I think.


Ok, but what type is it?



Your kinda generalizing I was looking for all those things you mention but a little more detailed.

Some of these I will not be taking apart just to scan and thats why I was wondering if a handheld was worth the powder to blow it up.


I have always used Cannon stuff, most of there software is pretty user friendly and will be keeping that in mind.
When I get home I'll try something out of a book and see how it does for you.
 

mdavlee

How the heck did this take so long?
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Ok. That one is pretty easy. Hit scan and tell it where to save to.
 

Philbert

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Some of these I will not be taking apart just to scan and thats why I was wondering if a handheld was worth the powder to blow it up.
Short answer is 'no'. Stick with a flatbed and accept that you may lose things by the margins/binding. Hand held scanner might be OK for receipts, etc.

Philbert
 
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Modifiedmark

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Short answer is 'no'. Stick with a flatbed and accept that you may lose things by the margins/binding. Hand held scanner might be OK for receipts, etc.

Philbert
That's what I was thinking. I remember seeing one once that had a hinge at the top and it expanded up if you put something thick like a book on it. I don't remember which one it was though.
 

Cut4fun

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chainsawrepair.createaforum.com
I had a HP scanner that you just set the top on whatever you were scanning. Worked great for many different reasons. Didnt have to put pages in it or disassemble books to do so. You just laid scanner on what you wanted scanned. If they are still out there look into that IMO. Google is wonderful. :wink:
 

PRJ

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High-resolution flatbed scanners are best. The scanners included with All-In-One Printers are ok as copy machines, but generally have poor resolution for photos.

I own an Epson PERFECTION 4870 PHOTO high resolution flatbed scanner. It has Firewire and USB interfaces and will scan both photos and negatives. I've had it for years and it does a great job.