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Sharpenin' Thread.

BloodOnTheIce

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Here's a little tutorial on how I sharpen chains, the chain here is a Stihl .325 x .063 RMC3 semi chisel chain.

I'm not an expert, but I do sharpen alot of chains every week and they seem to cut well for my customers.

The left side had hit something pretty good and was rounded over, the right was just a little dull and was
cutting to the one side according to the customer.

I'll have to grind it back to the red line to get it to put an edge on it. And I'll have to correct the
top plate angle.


My angle for this chain are
30 degree on the top plate


Most chains I stick with a 65 degree down angle, except ripping chains.


And adjust to the proper chain thickness, since I have one of grinders with the hydraulic
chain clamp. And you can see how damaged the left side is compared to the right
 
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BloodOnTheIce

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I adjust my wheel so it just contacts the tooth and doesn't quite bottom out in the gullet


Since the chain is damaged I'll have to make 3-5 passes around to get it back far enough
to make a clean cutting edge. There will be some tweeking my adjustments as I go along

This is after the first pass, the edge is still rounded over, and I haven't gone all the way into the gullet


2 more passes and I'm calling it good, tooth has a good edge
That's not a bur on the tooth just some crud.


The rakers are a tad high, but since this chain is off a MS250, don't want to make them to low.


Knocked them down to .025 and the chain is good to go.
Main thing hear is to have a good profile on the top of the raker.
 
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NORMZILLA44

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Yeah good stuff. I have hand filed going on 25 years. I did a bench mount grinder at a rental yard back in 93 or so, for a bit we have a Silvey at work I am going to try, and get back in to it. I do all the maintenace on our county work saws, and between them, and my own, well lets just say I have other things to do than just hand file saws. I have recently tried the 12v portables, and I am real impressed. A learning curve but doing really well, and cutting like a new chain just out of the box. My plan is to use both the bench mount, and the 12v. I did the rakers on a chain for my 365 work saw first time, as I am new at it to do rakers. Awesome!!
 

TK

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And here's just an example of what a properly sharpened chain can do for ya - This pic of of oak chips cut by a Husky 55 Rancher, 3/8" chain of the Oregon Vanguard flavor. Keep the rakers proper and the cutter sharp at the proper angles and you get this:



This can be said about nearly any saw/chain combo. You don't have to have a big saw to get results like this, just a sharp chain. A big saw is just capable of piling them up quicker.
 

mdavlee

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These were made playing with the swing arm. It's what I used to grind for work chains. It was soft maple that these chips came from.

070.jpg
 

young

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These were made playing with the swing arm. It's what I used to grind for work chains. It was soft maple that these chips came from.

show us your current setup with the razor sharp:yup:
 

mdavlee

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Here's 2 pictures of it. I'll try to get a few more tomorrow. It's almost my bedtime. Going cutting tomorrow so I need to get in bed early.:D

018.jpg

020.jpg
 

Wigglesworth

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And here's just an example of what a properly sharpened chain can do for ya - This pic of of oak chips cut by a Husky 55 Rancher, 3/8" chain of the Oregon Vanguard flavor. Keep the rakers proper and the cutter sharp at the proper angles and you get this:



This can be said about nearly any saw/chain combo. You don't have to have a big saw to get results like this, just a sharp chain. A big saw is just capable of piling them up quicker.

Tell me you didnt bag up your chips.... :banana:
 

TK

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Hey man you got different bags showing different types of chips thrown.... You get more people sharpening, buying stuff to sharpen, paying you to sharpen, asking questions about sharpening.... Promote proper chainsaw usage and it's a win win. Most people don't know what to expect so you give them an example :)
 

mdavlee

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Never thought about having chips there as a way to show people how chains should cut.
 

dboyd351

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Down angle on the top plate

I know this is an old thread, but I just read it and I've got a question. Blood says he uses a down angle of 65 degrees for everything but ripping chain. I realized I'm holding the down angle close to flat, so I check the illustrations on a couple of boxes of chain I have. The Oregon chain shows a down angle of 10 degrees for most of their chain and 0 degrees for a few, but Woodland Pro chain says to use a down angle of 60 degrees!!!
Thats a heck of a difference!!
Is the down angle very important? Am I now supposed to remember which chain is on which saw and be very careful to use those vastly different down angles? Maybe just use 30 degrees on both?
Any advice is appreciated.
 

Hedgerow

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I know this is an old thread, but I just read it and I've got a question. Blood says he uses a down angle of 65 degrees for everything but ripping chain. I realized I'm holding the down angle close to flat, so I check the illustrations on a couple of boxes of chain I have. The Oregon chain shows a down angle of 10 degrees for most of their chain and 0 degrees for a few, but Woodland Pro chain says to use a down angle of 60 degrees!!!
Thats a heck of a difference!!
Is the down angle very important? Am I now supposed to remember which chain is on which saw and be very careful to use those vastly different down angles? Maybe just use 30 degrees on both?
Any advice is appreciated.

I think the down angle Cale was referring to, is the angle at which he tilts the grinding unit's wheel. As was the folks at Woodland Pro. If perpendicular to the chain, it would be 90 degrees... If the grinding wheel was paralel with the chain, it would be zero...
It was referring to how much hook he wanted to have on the tooth. The 10 degree Oregon was referring to, may be the tilt of the file from the tooth's cutting point through the back of the cutter? Maybe he can come along and clarify with some sort of illustration..
 

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