Timber falling vids and pics.

northmanlogging

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Sep 30, 2013
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I'll punt.

its an old vid but it'll give the rest of ya's idears....

[video=youtube;foUBSoMBg0o]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=foUBSoMBg0o[/video]
 
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Huskstihl

New Member
Sep 30, 2013
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Hockley, TX
My very first tree falling video! It's hard to believe I'm now an old growth production faller given how I used to fall trees


[video=youtube;r_NfLicsNyo]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=r_NfLicsNyo[/video]
 
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roberte

Latte Lover
Sep 30, 2013
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My very first tree falling video! It's hard to believe I'm now an old growth production faller given how I used to fall trees


[video=youtube;r_NfLicsNyo]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=r_NfLicsNyo[/video]
old growth beard :laughing:
 
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MCW

Well-Known Member
Sep 29, 2013
198
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Riverland, South Australia
Most people from AS will know what type of felling I'm involved in. I'm certainly no logger and don't claim to be despite having a number of forestry accredited falling qualifications. Most of the work I do is windbreak falling on corporate farms with some domestic stuff. I've felled over 20,000 Casuarinas (a native Australian hardwood) for one corporate farm with around 40,000 to go. Average speed across the 20,000 was around 38 trees an hour ranging from 8 trees an hour in the larger, more technical trees to around 180 an hour in the smaller stuff. Despite all of this falling I have a lot to learn when bucking logs. The Norfolk Island Pine below was on this corporate farm next to a manager's house. The bottom video was some messy windbreak trees around 40 years old and some of the more difficult ones with interlocking canopies. There is no way you can fall these trees individually so domino type falling is necessary. This property has citrus, winegrapes, persimmons, and avocados and the extensive root systems on these Casuarinas is robbing valuable nutrients and water from the orchards, hence my job is to fall them. I pretty well drop them on top of one another and they are then either burnt on the spot (unless they are too big or close to the orchard) or towed out into the open with a loader. Some of these trees are that large that they have to be cut into thirds so a loader can even tow them (they aren't large by old growth standards but some went 48" at the base and were 120' tall - most of the older rows were over 32" and 100'). Casuarina wood is very heavy and when wet has an SG of around 1.3-1.4 and even when dry the older trees that are denser crack an SG of 1.
Good fun though :)

Norfolk Island Pine...

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/sNB0oE8dyj0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Casuarinas...

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/c52ee024QTI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 
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treeslayer2003

ON/OFF YES/NO?
Sep 29, 2013
28,110
178,210
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maryland's eastern shore
Most people from AS will know what type of felling I'm involved in. I'm certainly no logger and don't claim to be despite having a number of forestry accredited falling qualifications. Most of the work I do is windbreak falling on corporate farms with some domestic stuff. I've felled over 20,000 Casuarinas (a native Australian hardwood) for one corporate farm with around 40,000 to go. Average speed across the 20,000 was around 38 trees an hour ranging from 8 trees an hour in the larger, more technical trees to around 180 an hour in the smaller stuff. Despite all of this falling I have a lot to learn when bucking logs. The Norfolk Island Pine below was on this corporate farm next to a manager's house. The bottom video was some messy windbreak trees around 40 years old and some of the more difficult ones with interlocking canopies. There is no way you can fall these trees individually so domino type falling is necessary. This property has citrus, winegrapes, persimmons, and avocados and the extensive root systems on these Casuarinas is robbing valuable nutrients and water from the orchards, hence my job is to fall them. I pretty well drop them on top of one another and they are then either burnt on the spot (unless they are too big or close to the orchard) or towed out into the open with a loader. Some of these trees are that large that they have to be cut into thirds so a loader can even tow them (they aren't large by old growth standards but some went 48" at the base and were 120' tall - most of the older rows were over 32" and 100'). Casuarina wood is very heavy and when wet has an SG of around 1.3-1.4 and even when dry the older trees that are denser crack an SG of 1.
Good fun though :)

Norfolk Island Pine...

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/sNB0oE8dyj0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe>

Casuarinas...

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/c52ee024QTI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe>
looks good Matt, you are to modest. you probly cut almost as much as I do as much of my time is spent doing other things like skidding. them big trees have no lumber value? seems a shame to burn um.
 
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MCW

Well-Known Member
Sep 29, 2013
198
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Riverland, South Australia
Looks like pro work to me!
It is probably classed as pro by homeowners but in reality true loggers are a step above as they have a far wider skillset.

them big trees have no lumber value? seems a shame to burn um.
Sadly no. Originally a logging crew from the Adelaide Hills were going to take them down for free with two manual fallers and a mechanical harvester as Casuarina is traditionally a sought after hardwood for furniture and floorboards. These trees have been irrigated and also fertilised and the wood has grown far too fast and is too sappy. There were 3 main ages in all of these trees depending on which property they were on. The youngest were about 7-8 years old, middle aged trees were 19 years old, and the trees on the property in the bottom video were around 40 years old. The 40 year old trees were OK for firewood but that's about it.

For some reason after your videos, Crocodile Dundee clips keep showing up. Nice work BTW.
A DINGO TOOK MY BABEEEE!!!!
 
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twochains

Well-Known Member
Sep 29, 2013
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Here's one of (3) from today

[video=youtube;VV21xMEETgQ]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VV21xMEETgQ&feature=c4-overview&list=UU_NjqCPS3PCA_PGz4NCZuLA[/video]
 
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